UK - England

Sir Gawain and the Green Knight

"'Compulsively readable. ... Simon Armitage has given us an energetic, free-flowing, high-spirited version.' —Edward Hirsch, New York Times Book Review

One of the earliest great stories of English literature after BeowulfSir Gawain is the strange tale of a green knight on a green horse, who rudely interrupts King Arthur's Round Table festivities one Yuletide, challenging the knights to a wager. Simon Armitrage, one of Britain's leading poets, has produced an inventive and groundbreaking translation that helps liberate Gawain from academia."

View on Amazon (US) | (UK) | (Canada)

Three James Herriot Classics

"James Herriot’s timeless bestselling series is a delightfully fun look at a country veterinarian and the creatures that populate a charming English town.

Perhaps better than any other writer, James Herriot reveals the ties that bind us to the natural world. Collected here are three of his masterpieces which have been winning over animal lovers everywhere for almost fifty years. From his night visits to drafty barns during freezing northern England winters, to the beautiful vitality of rural life in the summertime, to the colorful menagerie of animals—and their owners—that pass through his office, Herriot vividly evokes the daily challenges and joys that come with being a veterinarian."

View on Amazon (US) | (UK) | (Canada)  Canada note: The books are only available separately so the first book is included in the link above. Here's book 2 & book 3.

Beowulf

"Beowulf is to English what the Odyssey is to Greek literature. Beowulf is also the oldest example of vernacular literature of any substance in the whole of Western Europe. Since its rediscovery and the appearance of the first printed editions in the middle of the last century, this moving and dramatic epic has attracted considerable scholarly attention, and Dr Swanton is able to draw on this wealth of scholarship to present a considered and balanced introduction to the poem. Explanatory notes, drawing on archaeological sources, expand the poet's more esoteric allusions and offer background information on contemporary manners and customs. A prose translation faces the text, which should be invaluable to both students and the general reader."

Note: We recommend this particular translation which is considered the best.

View on Amazon (US) | (UK) | (Canada)

Through the Looking Glass

"Alice laughed. 'There's no use trying,' she said: 'one can't believe impossible things.'
'I daresay you haven't had much practice,' said the Queen. 'When I was your age, I always did it for half-an-hour a day. Why, sometimes I've believed as many as six impossible things before breakfast.'

The 1872 sequel to Alice's Adventures in Wonderland finds Carroll's inquisitive heroine in a fantastic land where everything is reversed. Alice encounters talking flowers, madcap kings and queens, and becomes a pawn in a bizarre chess game involving Humpty Dumpty, Tweedledum and Tweedledee, and other amusing nursery-rhyme characters."

View on Amazon (US) | (UK) | (Canada)